Posts tagged: Art

Ascension Parish by Ross Beach

I was pleasantly surprised when Ross Beach shared his latest album with me (it’s officially due out March 25th). I find it quite enjoyable, much as I find all of his records. Ascension Parish bears the superior engineering and eclectic instrumentation that are the hallmarks of Ross’ recorded works. He describes the album as “country/folk/americana” but the perspective is modern and the preponderance of its sentiments are alternately dry and caustic. Play “Laundry Lint” for any accomplished domestic male who’s had to surrender his relationship with the washing of his own clothes and he will invariably connect with Mr. Beach the songsmith. Much of this set breathes in the terminal damnation of the living and exhales in supple, chiming verses and clever choruses, with their intriguing progressions often coyly telegraphed from afar but still warmly received upon arrival. With all he’s obviously endured and has still emerged smiling, please do at least reward Ross Beach with a listen. No matter whether you do, it seems Ross will continue to bring these delightful collections our way.

Desolo Luna Vox Theatrum, fifth Mondays on KBOO

Richard A. Francis

Richard A. Francis

(I was devastated to learn of Richard Francis’ passing today.  Richard was one of the most generous, honest and caring people I have ever had the pleasure of working with, someone who cherished fun and was serious about love and harmony – although his taste in music strayed towards the dis-harmonic and his devotion to the avant-garde often seemed incongruous with his discipline and his attention to planning and detail.

Richard Francis had been a consummate champion of the KBOO community and his passing is a huge loss.

Back in the mid-Eighties, Richard and I at his invitation, and after he had allowed me to substitute for him on one occasion – collaborated on a pair of installments of his long-running program A Different Nature.  The first of these programs was devoted entirely to the music of John Cale, whom we both worshiped; Richard graciously arranged that we meet at his apartment – the walls were covered from floor to ceiling with books – where he prepared a pasta dinner, we discussed European literature and planned the show down to the second; he then loaned me the first three Cale-produced Nico albums which I had yet to hear.

The other program, Sleaze,” kidnapped a 5- or 6-hour late-night block of the program schedule in the service of  Richard’s idea – to make use of the hours that allowed for more racy material than he was usually allowed to play during his usual mid-evening slot.  I recall thinking that Richard’s idea of “blue” material was just as opaque as the balance of his obsessions – much of the “earotica” he saved for this program would have confused any would-be censors. At the two-thirds mark of the program we were getting pretty loopy and it was Richard who strove to keep us on track and focus on the programming rather than our inside jokes.

Ultimately I would settle in to my own program and we would each uphold our individual ends of the air.  At the time I chose to leave my gig behind, Richard was working harder than ever to guide station policy and unite its disparate factions.  I am humbled that after 15 years away I was welcomed back into Richard’s utopian vision of radioland, and I am grateful that we were able to collaborate a final time.

I am somewhat sad and quite disappointed that he was unable to hear this, but I am blessed to offer it as a memento.  This is one of three pieces that I promised Richard for what was to be the last show that he missed.  Throughout the production of these pieces during August 29-30, 2009 – and particularly of “Shaman,” with Richard’s almost unrecognizable voice affecting that of a tired, old man in my headphones – I hoped to make him proud of our collaboration.  It seems that its funereal mood was more than coincidence.  Love and farewell, Richard.  We will do our best to carry on without your warmth and enthusiasm. – Luke Lefler, September 6, 2009)

For ten leguminous years 90.7 FM KBOO Portland was the non-commercial, community radio home of Baron Landscape’s Broken Hours.  Every Sunday at midnight the Baron, bugler at the unprotected gates of dawn and raven-soft underjelly upon the fibrous circuitry, imprimpted his dubious brand of comedy and erstwhile music predications to-upon the greater metro polita, and it was a good run toward a seemingly predestined burn-out in the watershed year 1993.

It wasn’t until July of 2008 that Baron Landscape would endeavor to helm such radio as befit his high standards and return to KBOO with The Wreck of The Broken Landscape (see BLBH #12).  Around this same time we made the acquaintance of Rich Lindsay who informed us that long-time difficult-listening guru Richard Francis was mounting a 101-hour continuous celebration of Surrealism and Dada to overtake KBOO’s airwaves later that summer.

The shimmerling prospect of bloofing eepy radio m’bobs with other types enchanted us ferocious.  Therefore to those 101 diabolic hours, Broken Wounders houred up contributing over two-thirds of one hour – 23:23 of which was the monumental yet rarely-heard feral Boboist putrefaction The Herbed Brie Period By B. Blatherscape, Even (annoyingly unavailable for distribution due to licensing issues) (this situ hath been remedied – LL, 10/2016).

Creating the work for this festival was liberating, and the controversial (to some, anyway) celebration invigorated its many producers, Splice Finders included. Certain key individuals hoped subscreantly to re-air much of the material what had previomously come, and they additiomally desired a permanent place for us Surrealadadactyls to roam.

Thus clungterfly to the spatula joculaire and pursuant to radical reorganization of the KBOO evening program schedule, a place was farted unblong to traverse four hours from 8:00 pm to Midnight on every Monday that is the fifth Monday of a month.  It was crispened Desolo Luna Vox Theatrum, a name Richard explains he came up with “playing around with an English-Latin dictionary website.”  He says it means “Abandoned Moon Cry Theater.”

Presuming that which is abandoned to be either the Moon or its cry, we have Deicided to regularly contribute to the theater, taking our cues from Richard and his co-producer Sean Ongley.  The Anfangsgobs dieser Opfer d’oddio were broken spectales on a pair of Kurt Scwhitters pieces that met (we’re assured) with delight on the part of translator/interpreter Jack Zipes when they aired in June, 2009.

Material by Argentinian poet Oliverio Girondo was feted on the August 31, 2009 Theatrum, and – always down with a theme – Horas Quebradas spritely emboldened Richard’s performances of two pieces from Girondo’s Scarecrow with our prosaic “original music and additional production.”  Affixed hereto via the PowerPress is the elegiac “Shaman (version)” (Scarecrow #15), the choirs of bees and VSTs of which we’ve meddled with even a littly bit further since its air date, for the posterity “version” if one may – enjoy these minutos rotos lánguidos.

Three Friends Mondays: Caffeinated Art #43

 

The Three Scrapettes

David Abel, Marko Whens, Tony Christy and Leo Daedalus

We love what we do at Show and Tell Gallery, and we ask for no more than a bit of attention paid to those whom we bring to the stage.  Melissa Sillitoe signs them up, Nikia Cummings spreads the word and I gruffly co-produce and capture things for posterity as best I can.

On May 4, 2009, The Three Scrapettes sont descendus parmi les vibreurs et le papier et les un bon nombre de mutant de cri avec des mots to bring us “2+2=3” – Sound Poetry and Paraperformance with a variety of “non-acts, sound poems, peripheral pieces, audience impersonations and wrong solutions” that paid back in full the efforts we expend to make Portland a more caffeinated and arty placebo.  They offermade up some biographicallistic fallacies: Marko Whens falsely proclaims to be the first poet to misspell (in? -ed.) every language.  Tony Christy‘s father was a scrap surgeon his mother a mitt mender.  Leo Daedalus imagines that the ideal expression of any particular art form would have to be realized in a different form.  David Abel studied with Massenet and Fauré at the Paris Conservatoire (1890-97), then lived uneventfully as a teacher and theorist.

Let loose in Three Friends Coffee House, the four of them made incomprehensible, joyous mayhem on indirect trajectories from Dada, Fluxus, Surrealism and Situationism. The Broken Hours Remix is all spoiled up by Splice Finders with his little with ACID Pro 7.0c thingly in his basement area with his stuff in there and everything, he likes to say.  Roughed out and rhyming, the RSS feed leads the sojourning data file hefty onto your portable sound charmer off the media Montserrat Internet Archives grabbing burny onto the twine shall occasionally meet:

Play

The Show and Tell Gallery Podcast #9

For the second of three Show and Tell Gallery Productions events in one week the featured art was feeling multi-sourced and the touchable performers were  familiar and reliable.  Not so mit podcrash inducer Splice Finders feeling a patch of blackness, perhaps due to driving around Show and Tell Gallery Towers for half-an-hour looking for a parking place to touch, or perhaps due to the touched feelings of the besotted gentleman whom Richard Schemmerer astutely escorted “to another gallery.”  More likely it was Splicey’s maniacal desire to employ both mono- and tri-podal digital capturing thingies that distracted him just long enough that he did not notice the flashing standby light feeling like being touched on the stoic Olympus LS-10 until the middle of Eric McEuen‘s set. 
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We’re afraid that you’ll need to go back to the Three Friends Mondays: Caffeinated Art #30 podcast to hear the one about the fish – that toe-tapping one about, ironically, disappointment – because the only part of his set that was captured consisted of Eric’s touching interpretations of, among others, Neil Diamond and The Beatles, and the Splicemeitser cannot afford even the few cents in heartfelt royalties that would be due those deserving songcrafters.

Feeling: A Touching Show was itself missing the work of Gary Aker, who was feeling a touch of the crud on March 5, 2009.   That left Patrick Bocarde, Brittany Baldwin and Rick J to flesh out the touching performance portion of the feeling presentation with spoken words, whilst the visual art by Rage Anders, Melissa Armstrong, Dave Benz, Brittle Star, Nicolas Hall, James Honzik, Chris Ives, Elizabeth Kuzmovich, Richard Schemmerer, Anna Todaro, Robin Urton and Cathie Joy Young remains tactilely available at the gallery through March, 2009 or monetarily yours at the sensualist shrine of your choosing indefinitely.  Attendees Wayne Flower, Michael Berton, Tom Mattox, Christian Kenseth, Benjamin Fisher, and Dan Tree and Emma (and Celestial Concubine, who touched down at the after chow) have all long since felt the sheets and touched the pillow.   The Show and Tell Gallery Podcast caress thine soft ears just there, no, there, yes, that’s the spot, and on the spong-iTunes-a-dermis subscribus so if you want to, and you feel like it, then it’s okay, you can touch its link:

http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=295435468

The Show and Tell Gallery Podcast #8

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Melissa Sillitoe welcomes Laura Chase

Gallantly, the  evening air warmed up a skosh for the first First Thursday opening of the year for the Show and Tell Gallery, a return to the source for the unsinkable Melissa Sillitoe who, naturally, had wavered at the prospect of continuing to host receptions at her live-in artspace.  The turbulent economic predictions clapping together with last year’s unexpected retirement of First Thursday at The Core Gallery, which shares the same trough aloft, were conspiring to freeze out this humble and geeky operation from the flow of the more terrestrial galleries in the Everett Station Galleries building.  However, the enduring promise of fulfillment and monkeyshines obligado forecast another show, and with the Spring perhaps more will blossom.

Messenger (2008), acrylic on wood

Verily did Melissa rain-dance another lightning-strike event, turning first to prior collaborator Lea Keohane, who has stayed busy and brave during the Winter season and who has hung her delightful pieces along the main concourse in the sky above Everett Street amongst the isobars and areas of convergence and divergence in the wind field (which are helpful in determining the location of extreme points along the spectrum).   The next ray of sunlight belonged to Laura Chase, having returned fresh from West Africa to parlez pearly dewdrops of pop and samba, followed like a rainbow by the hyper-chipper hip-hop of  Inkre:mentals with an album soon to drop and who-all brought in many lovely attendees (of whom one was, to our surprise, our favorite check-out king Jason) to minglebrate with supporters Mikey Golightly, Anna Todaro, Mike G, Christian, James Honzik, Becca Yenser and The Dark Lord, among many others, in addition to saintly gallery volunteers Dwight Peters, Patrick Bocarde, Rick J and Eric McEuen.  For our part, we had a nice conversation in the back of the house with Wayne Flower, who pointed our anemometer towards his own visual expressions.

Inkre:mentals

Inkre:mentals

Podcast producer Splice Finders was criminally loved and appreciated by Inkre:mentals Justin Eder and Jesse Gardner.  The backatcha cloudburst of enthusiasm for this MC positive pair and the perseverance of Tiffany (aka DJ ASAP) upon a beat system less-than-loud ushered a warm front of victorious vibes through the assemblage, many of whose errant voices were captured in the sleety Show and Tell Gallery Podcast, which is in da here fo’ sho, we hope, what fo’ Broken Hours’ own technical difficulture re: this index has been de-rigged.

Representz the Show and Tell Gallery Podcast do too on the inexorable iTunes audi-file storm-gathering jet stream with this link-a-dink:

http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=295435468

The Show and Tell Gallery Podcast #7

Ray Ottoboni

Ray Ottoboni

As hard to believe as it may be, the First Thursday opening at The Show and Tell Gallery on December 4, 2008, came off smoothly although the absence of vacationing curator Melissa Sillitoe made for a comparatively low-key event.  In her stead Luke Lefler, the Gallery’s shy and quiet Digital Media Producer, hosted the reception for Robin Carlisle.  Among the works on display were several from Robin’s house series: “I have painted hundreds of little house paintings and they just seem to keep coming out of me.  Mainly they are cute and warm and cozy and soft.  But they are also a super strong symbol to me.  They are little capsules, like diaries that tell stories.   They hold the most intimate details of people’s lives, histories, futures, dreams and emotions.”  Unfortunately Robin had had a pair of wisdom teeth extracted earlier in the day and she had to excuse herself before the music program which was put together by Michael Hart.  Michael and musician invitees Ray Ottoboni, Michael Pan and Lou & Anthony, as well as the sounds of people mingling and Luke interjecting a flaccid welcome to those in attendance, may all be heard on The Show and Tell Gallery Podcast.

(This podcast is currently unavailable.)

Three Friends Mondays: Caffeinated Art #22

Myrrh Larsen, Becca Yenser and Arsalan Darbandi

Myrrh Larsen, Becca Yenser and Arsalan Darbandi

The Three Friends Coffee House series and oasis sprung forth a Caffeine Monday event of majestic sound and vision and words on November 24, forever contained within the boundaries of kiss, with dignity, and characterized by the finely attired and attuned.  Consider the texture, tension, gloom, womanly thighs and heckling from a fearless foursome podcast for your edification.  You will notice, as the crackly mix of thumb and thunder swells from Myrrh Larsen‘s vintage amp and foot thingy, a persistent and often rhythmic scraping in the mid-range.  Indeed it is Arsalan Darbandi of his digestion of gods continueth with utensil in hand and intensity grating his vision onto some hard, flat and portable portal to the infinite.

Then, a reading, giving way to a testament to the bone-drought of love and life, casual in its haunted waffle embers of observation, delivered in delicate, brutal detail by Becca Yenser.  After a right turn at the anthropology stacks and rocketing straight from downtown Portland, Oregon flies Patrick Bocarde (who after all is not the invited but simply absent Chris Haberman) in his destroyer-of-worlds machine, and the mood of the monster poet is typically playful, declaiming, tending to shock and awe-shucking.  Arsalan continues to claw out jewels from bare boards while Becca’s waffle iron cools on the tiled counter of our abeyance, and for the finale more Myrrh, who has offered to appear even while buried in the task of producing an album with his band, and who conjures a post-rock toastie that must have belonged to a host of angelic lieder.  We drank our coffee and had community courtesy of the nearly-famous Melissa Sillitoe‘s Show and Tell Gallery Productions.

And ya know… you’ll find the podcast on the Three Friends Mondays: Caffeinated Series page at brokenhours.net.

Also, now you can access the Three Friends Mondays: Caffeinated Series podcast via iTunes using this link:

http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=295435461

The Broken Will of the People 2008 – Off The Hook (Continued) (BLBH #7)

Based on an art deco danceteria of obfuscation and forced labor.  Wherefore thou, Art?  Seedless to psycho and back again, the Broken Will of the People, rudimentary in its ornateness and perfect as a puzzle, make tired your listening eyes and the fumes corrupt the double- and triple-negative irony so forth and interpretively.  Or adjustments to the center, for several cycles, without food or water for days, harvested for posterity and dedicated to the opposition of a more imperfect disunion. Music by Broken Hours. Podcast produced by Splice Finders.

Three Friends Mondays: Caffeinated Art #19

Caffeinated Art happens every Monday from 7-8 p.m. at Three Friends Coffee House when three creative friends present a show, produced by Show and Tell Gallery Productions.

On Monday, November 3, Rick J and Garret Potter performed spoken word whilst Eric McEuen improvised on acoustic guitar.

The city had suffered rolling blackouts since rush hour and, in addition to snarled traffic throughout the Three Friends neighborhood, at showtime the coffee house was lit only by dozens of candles.  Listen closely during Eric McEuen’s music break after Garret Potter’s performance, as the crowd responds when the power comes on.  By acclamation the darkness was restored for the remainder of the event, a remarkable, transcendent performance.

Also, now you can access the Three Friends Mondays: Caffeinated Series podcast via iTunes using this link:

http://phobos.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=295435461

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